The Jai Jais Blog

What Are Hinduism's Holy Texts?

What Are Hinduism's Holy Texts?

The most ancient sacred texts of the Hindu religion are written in Sanskrit and called the Vedas.

Hinduism does not just have one sacred book but several scriptures. The Vedas scriptures guide Hindus in their daily life. They also help to preserve the religious dimensions of family and society. Hindus have developed their system of worship and beliefs from the scriptures.

There are two main categories of the Hindu scriptures:

Shruti-"That which is heard", consists of the four Vedas and Upanishads scriptures.

Smriti-"That which is remembered", composed of traditional texts, including the Dharma Shastras (legal and ethical texts), the Puranas, and the folk/historical legends known as the Mahabharata and Ramayana. Let's find out more The Jai Jais way.

Why does Hinduism have so many gods and goddesses?

Why does Hinduism have so many gods and goddesses?

Hinduism, the world’s third largest religion, is often considered a polytheistic faith, as the religion does not advocate the worship of one particular deity. However, the Hindu belief system includes a complex structure of deities that is not easily categorised.

Hinduism includes an abundance of deities, each one representing a certain aspect of the Supreme Absolute, which is known as Brahma, because they are all manifestations of the same divine spirit. There are deities represented in the family, the community, and the region of the country. There are deities recognised in the plants, the stars, the rivers, the mountains and the planets. We worship the divine in the form that each individual belief system supports, which are suitable and inspiring to the individual. Hindu Dharma recognises the divine is infinite. That embraces all creation, all of the worlds and something beyond. We honour the divine which is intimate to ourselves. Let's find out more in our blog.

Why do Hindus wear a Tilak on their forehead?

Why do Hindus wear a Tilak on their forehead?

Tilak, tikka, bindi, kumkum, sindoor or a ‘dot’ on the forehead of an Hindu woman is common as it tells a married status of a woman. Have you ever ...
Kamadeva the God of Love

Kamadeva the God of Love

We all know about the beautiful Goddess Parvati, the Goddess of love. Did you know Hinduism has it’s very own Indian cupid… A God of Love?... I never knew of “Kamadeva”, the Hindu god of love. Growing up he was never a god that we spoke about or prayed too.  So how did I come across him? Well I was researching content for our fifth birthday launch and found a god that had five arrows, so I was intrigued to find out more about the parrot riding, greenish god Kamadeva. He is often shown with his female counterpart Rati. Read more about Kamadeva and his five arrows of love.
Hinduism and The 5 Elements

Hinduism and The 5 Elements

Different cultures and philosophies around the world have defined the “5 elements” of life. The system of five elements are found in Vedas, especially Ayurveda, the ‘Pancha Mahabhuta’, or “five great elements”, of Hinduism. The entire cosmic creation begins from the point of the Pancha Mahabhuta.

There are 5 elements in this universe:

Akash-Space

Vayu-Air

Fire-Agni

Jal-Water

Earth-Prithvi

Interestingly these 5 elements have got an interesting relationship to five senses. Find out more about the elements The Jai Jais way

Days of Diwali with The Jai Jais

Days of Diwali with The Jai Jais

Light is one of the oldest and most meaningful symbols, found in cultures and religions worldwide. Deepawali, Deepavali, or Diwali is the biggest and the brightest of all Hindu festivals. It is the festival of lights: deep means "light" and avali "a row" to become "a row of lights." The Festival of Lights, is the most popular Hindu festival of good overcoming evil. The triumph of light over darkness is celebrated with Divas, lamps and fireworks. Diwali is composed of five days, each with its own story. 

What is Karva Chauth?

What is Karva Chauth?

In a religion, where festivals form the essence of life. The colour and the vibrancy. The deep
and meaningful symbolism behind the festivals we celebrate, Karva Chauth is no exception. The word Karva Chauth has a specific meaning. Karva means earthen pot while chauth means fourth. Karwa Chauth is about making offerings to the moon using Karva. Karva Chauth the festival of happiness and togetherness celebrated by married as well as unmarried women, for the long life of their husbands and partners. As per the Hindu traditions in any
festival that celebrates the bond of marriage or love, worshipping Lord Shiva and Goddess Paravti is an essential part of the rituals. Unlike other festivals, this festival is more about following rituals, observing fasts and the best part is dressing up like a newly-wed bride and worshipping the moon. All these together make this festival a celebration of the bond of love
and marriage.
A Bond between Generations with The Jai Jais. One from the heart

A Bond between Generations with The Jai Jais. One from the heart

One things that has been absolutely magical and so precious to me has been testimonials of parents that have said how their children have always taken the books to share with their grandparents.  What a perfect way to bridge a generation gap and let those stories live on through generations. One parent told me she had to buy extra sets to keep at each of the grandparents houses!  One of my most cherished moments is when my eldest son sat and did Jai Jai with his great grandfather and they spent time laughing, talking and reading my books.  It was amazing to see a 100 year old great grandfather and his 3 years old great grandchild have something in common, sharing the most treasured times and beloved memories
When Rama met Sita.

When Rama met Sita.

With Diwali round the corner I couldn’t help turning to the epic love story of ancient Hindu Legend, “The Ramayana”.  Again a beautiful love story of the fight of good over evil. The stories of Rama and Sita are famous throughout the world and their tales are told in the Ramayana. Rama and Sita are husband and wife. Sita is kidnapped by the demon king Ravan and Rama goes to rescue her. They have many adventures and troubles along the way. In the end, Rama and Sita are reunited.

So how did Rama meet Sita?... Here is an extract from the Jai Jais Legends Series “ The Ramayana”, Page 9-10.  Find out more in our blog.

Dusshera

Dusshera

With the Diwali upon us, let your child connect to super heroes in true festive spirit, with ‘The Jai Jais’. The Indian tradition understands the power of storytelling to ignite the curiosity of young minds in exploring the hidden depths of our religion, culture and roots. Who doesn’t love super heroes? For a child or a teenager… even as an adult, I am learning so much with this journey with ‘The Jai Jais’. Super-heroes are awesome! and festive occasions offer parents a unique opportunity to sit down and just enjoy the good times with their little ones. Now, what about festivals like Dussehra and Diwali? Well, these festivals too have ‘super-heroes’, in a way that children may not know…. The Jai Jais certainly have a whole host of super heroes. Come and join our adventures.  
Maha Navami & Durga Ashtami

Maha Navami & Durga Ashtami

On 24th October 2020, Hindus will be celebrating its most popular festivals- Durga Ashtmi and Maha Navmi pooja. Usually, Maha Navami pooja is celebrated on the next day of Durga Ashtami. However, this year, the two festivals are occurring on the same day. “Ashtami” and “Navmi” mean the eighth and the ninth day of Navratri that is dedicated to Goddess Durga.

How Is It Celebrated?

‘Maha Navmi’ pooja is considered to hold so much value that the worship on this day is equivalent to all the nine days of  ‘Navratri’. Traditionally every state in India has different and unique ways to celebrate the festival but what remains common is the worship of the mighty Goddess Durga.

The Meaning Behind Mataji Aarti & Translation

The Meaning Behind Mataji Aarti & Translation

Arti, (Hindi “the ceremony of lights”) Sanskrit “Aratrika”, in Hindu rituals is the offering of lighted divas before an image of a god or goddesses. In performing the ritual the worshiper circles the diva in a clockwise direction while chanting a prayer or singing a hymn. Aarti is one of the most frequently observed parts of both temple and home pooja. The god or goddess is honoured by the lighted ghee (clarified butter) or camphor and is protected by the invocation of the deities of the directions of the compass.