The Jai Jais Blog

Days of Diwali with The Jai Jais

Days of Diwali with The Jai Jais

Light is one of the oldest and most meaningful symbols, found in cultures and religions worldwide. Deepawali, Deepavali, or Diwali is the biggest and the brightest of all Hindu festivals. It is the festival of lights: deep means "light" and avali "a row" to become "a row of lights." The Festival of Lights, is the most popular Hindu festival of good overcoming evil. The triumph of light over darkness is celebrated with Divas, lamps and fireworks. Diwali is composed of five days, each with its own story. 

Kali Ma A Goddess Misunderstood

Kali Ma A Goddess Misunderstood

Kali Ma… Visually a scary looking goddess with her tongue protruding, large shimmering eyes, skulls around her neck, a skirt of arms, holding a severed head! Kali Ma the goddesses of time and change.  Kali Ma has been misrepresented into a scary tantric goddess, but what are the truths behind the goddess? Kali comes from the Sanskrit root word ‘Kal’ which means time. Her symbols are flowers, dance, iron, swords, peacock feathers and honey.  Even in destruction, she reminds us that good really can come of bad situations. If you find your hopes and dreams have been crushed, Kali can change the cycle and produce life out of nothingness. Where there is sorrow, She dances to bring joy. Where there is fear, She dances in courage.
A Brothers Bond

A Brothers Bond

The classic bond of the Rama-Lakshman ‘Jodi’.  The unconditional bond between two brothers.  Step but step together supporting and protecting each other.  The original scriptures were written in Sanskrit by the Sage Valmiki in the epic Ramayana. Its tells the story of the majestic bond between two brothers. I have an older brother, my mum would laugh and say you are like two boys… wow did we fight? Gosh which siblings don’t? but unconditional love remains.
The Demons of the Ramayana

The Demons of the Ramayana

Villains, ghosts, witches and demons, every good story has a bad guy…. The conflict of “good” versus “evil”.  Somehow good always prevails, but who doesn’t like a “Happy Ending?”.

The Ramayana, the story of the mighty warrior Lord Rama through his trials and tribulations, has inspired millions over the centuries. Originally written in the ancient language of Sanskrit by Sage Valmiki, the Ramayana teaches us about Dharma (duty and righteousness), devotion, hope, bravery, respect, confidence, among many more qualities.

Exiled for fourteen years, by his dearest father King Dasharatha, Lord Rama began an adventure to save his beautiful wife Princess Sita from the evil demon Ravana; with his faithful brother Lakshamana, and companion Hanuman.  The finale is his mighty battle with Ravana but along the way with his trusted  bow….there are a number of demons they slay…. But who are they?, many blogs talk about the gods and goddesses, but it’s time to find out more about the bad guys. All these demons do not feature in the Jai Jais Ramayana as the version is shortened for children to enjoy.

TAKE NOTE: There will be some gore which may not be suitable for some children.

Dusshera

Dusshera

With the Diwali upon us, let your child connect to super heroes in true festive spirit, with ‘The Jai Jais’. The Indian tradition understands the power of storytelling to ignite the curiosity of young minds in exploring the hidden depths of our religion, culture and roots. Who doesn’t love super heroes? For a child or a teenager… even as an adult, I am learning so much with this journey with ‘The Jai Jais’. Super-heroes are awesome! and festive occasions offer parents a unique opportunity to sit down and just enjoy the good times with their little ones. Now, what about festivals like Dussehra and Diwali? Well, these festivals too have ‘super-heroes’, in a way that children may not know…. The Jai Jais certainly have a whole host of super heroes. Come and join our adventures.  
Maha Navami & Durga Ashtami

Maha Navami & Durga Ashtami

On 24th October 2020, Hindus will be celebrating its most popular festivals- Durga Ashtmi and Maha Navmi pooja. Usually, Maha Navami pooja is celebrated on the next day of Durga Ashtami. However, this year, the two festivals are occurring on the same day. “Ashtami” and “Navmi” mean the eighth and the ninth day of Navratri that is dedicated to Goddess Durga.

How Is It Celebrated?

‘Maha Navmi’ pooja is considered to hold so much value that the worship on this day is equivalent to all the nine days of  ‘Navratri’. Traditionally every state in India has different and unique ways to celebrate the festival but what remains common is the worship of the mighty Goddess Durga.

The Meaning Behind Mataji Aarti & Translation

The Meaning Behind Mataji Aarti & Translation

Arti, (Hindi “the ceremony of lights”) Sanskrit “Aratrika”, in Hindu rituals is the offering of lighted divas before an image of a god or goddesses. In performing the ritual the worshiper circles the diva in a clockwise direction while chanting a prayer or singing a hymn. Aarti is one of the most frequently observed parts of both temple and home pooja. The god or goddess is honoured by the lighted ghee (clarified butter) or camphor and is protected by the invocation of the deities of the directions of the compass. 

Navratri with The Jai Jais 2020

Navratri with The Jai Jais 2020

The eve before one of the most popular Hindu festivals of 2020.  I can’t help but take time out for reflection.  Navratri has always been a festival dear to my heart.  Maybe it’s because of how much I adore and admire the Hindu Goddesses.  Their symbolism, their power “shakti”, what they represent. The empowerment for women from within. The fight of good over evil. Find out how we are celebrating in 2020.