The Jai Jais Blog

The Symbolism of Lord Shiva

The Symbolism of Lord Shiva

Lord Shiva is the focus of the festival, who is part of the Hindu Trinity which also includes Brahma, who created the universe and Vishnu, who preserved it. Shiva is also known as the destroyer, and he is seen as someone who protects and transforms the universe.

Mahashivratri is celebrated on the day when Lord Shiva saved the world by drinking poison that emerged from the ocean during Samudra Manthan. This poison got stored in his throat thus making it blue which is the reason that Lord Shiva is also known as Neelkanth (blue throat). Read more fascinating stories on Lord Shiva in our Jai Jai blogs.

Picture of Lord Shiva would not be the same without a snake around his neck, the crescent moon, his drum, his magnificent Trishul and course his faithful bull Nandi.  Like everything in Hinduism all of these have symbols have a meaning.  Let’s find out The Jai Jais way.

The Origins of Yoga

The Origins of Yoga

In Vedic Sanskrit, Yoga means “to add,” and it can also mean connection and union. There are many stories surrounding the beginnings of Yoga, and the oldest known stories surround the Hindu Gods, including Lord Shiva. Four specific periods pertain to the origins of Yoga, and these are:

  1. Vedic Period
  2. Pre-Classical Period
  3. Classical Period
  4. Post-Classical Period

Understanding each period is essential, but it’s particularly important to get to grips on the Vedic Period and what happened before that time. Let’s explore this.