The Jai Jais Blog

Let’s Celebrate the Makar Sankranti

Let’s Celebrate the Makar Sankranti

Makar Sankranti is known as the ‘Kite Flying Festival’, it falls on the 14th January every year. It is a very auspicious day. It is dedicated to the Lord of the Sun. To Hindus, the sun stands for knowledge, spiritual light and wisdom. It refers to a specific solar day in the Hindu calendar. On this day, the sun enters the zodiac sign of Capricorn or ‘Makar’ which marks the end of winter month and start of longer days. On Makar Sankranti, the sun begins its journey northward.
 
Although this harvest festival is celebrated on the same day across the India, it is celebrated in different regions, with different traditions that highlight the rich and vibrant cultural of each place. Find out more in our blog.
 
Let us keep our kite soaring higher and higher through our positive thoughts, actions and attitude. Makar Sankranti signifies that we should turn away from the darkness, and begin to let the light within us shine bright. We should grow in purity, wisdom and knowledge just as the sun does from this day. Sun stands for all ideals; its message is that of light, unity, equality and true selflessness.
Find out more about the festival, The Jai Jais Way.
Happy Kite Flying
What is Lohri?

What is Lohri?

Lohri is celebrated on the 13th January each year.  The Punjabi festival of Lohri marks the end of winter and is traditionally associated with harvest of the Rabi crop. All the farmers get together in order to thank god for giving them such a wonderful harvest. The day after Lohri is “Maghi” the Punjabi farmers financial New Year.

The rituals related to Lohri symbolise the attachment of the people with Mother Nature. The period between January 13 and July 14 is considered prosperous by Hindus. According to the Bhagawad Gita, Krishna manifests himself 'in his full magnificence' during this time. It has been also told that Holika and Lohri were sisters. While the former perished in the Holi fire, the latter survived with Prahlad, the story of Holi.

So what is Lohri and how is it celebrated? 

What is the Symbolism of the Coconuts in Hinduism?

What is the Symbolism of the Coconuts in Hinduism?

What is the Symbolism of the Coconuts in Hinduism?

The humble coconut, one of the hardest fruits growing in sandy soil, requiring little water or maintenance. In Hindi it is known as “Nariyal” which translate literally as, “fruit containing water”. In Sanskrit it is known as “Sirphal” which means “God’s fruit”.

One of the most common offerings in a temple is a coconut. It is also offered on occasions like weddings, festivals, the use of a new vehicle or home. The coconut is a symbol of good luck and prosperity.  Every auspicious occasion begins with the breaking of the coconut. It is regarded as a symbol of Lord Ganesh who removes obstacles and helps us to succeed in any tasks we embark on.

Fine out more The Jai Jais Way

Energy Enhancing Chakras

Energy Enhancing Chakras

What are Chakras?

The chakra system originated in India between 1500 and 500 BC in the ancient text the Vedas. The word “Chakra” in Sanskrit means wheel. Chakras refer to the energy centres in your body. These wheels or disks of spinning energy each correspond to certain nerve bundles and major organs. For you to functions at your best your Chakras need to stay balanced and open. If the Cakras are blocked you may experience emotional, physical symptoms related to the part of the body. When all the Chakras are open energy can run through the body freely.  This creates harmony between the physical body, mind and spirit.

The 7 main chakras, which align with the spine, starting from the base of the spine (root chakra) through to the top of the head (crown chakra). By learning about the 7 chakras, you can become more in tune with the natural energy cycles of your body.

Spring into 2021 with well-being on top of your agenda and balance your Chakras with The Jai Jais. Follow the next 7 days of the new year for a fun facts file of the Chakras and how these can influence and benefit you.

How Hanuman Got his Monkey Face?

How Hanuman Got his Monkey Face?

Mummy, "Why has Hanuman got a face like a monkey?", this was one of the first questions asked by my son when we were doing our Jai Jai one day. An inquisitive little mind with a thirst for knowledge. So what did mummy do? Find out The Jai Jais way.

Hindu mythology is full of intriguing stories. Stories of what happened are told in many ways. If we are willing to learn each story has its own charm, and we learn in a fun way and engaging way with the Jai Jais. There are many stories of how Hanuman got his monkey face here is one. The Jai Jais Way.

Kamadeva the God of Love

Kamadeva the God of Love

We all know about the beautiful Goddess Parvati, the Goddess of love. Did you know Hinduism has it’s very own Indian cupid… A God of Love?... I never knew of “Kamadeva”, the Hindu god of love. Growing up he was never a god that we spoke about or prayed too.  So how did I come across him? Well I was researching content for our fifth birthday launch and found a god that had five arrows, so I was intrigued to find out more about the parrot riding, greenish god Kamadeva. He is often shown with his female counterpart Rati. Read more about Kamadeva and his five arrows of love.
Hinduism and The 5 Elements

Hinduism and The 5 Elements

Different cultures and philosophies around the world have defined the “5 elements” of life. The system of five elements are found in Vedas, especially Ayurveda, the ‘Pancha Mahabhuta’, or “five great elements”, of Hinduism. The entire cosmic creation begins from the point of the Pancha Mahabhuta.

There are 5 elements in this universe:

Akash-Space

Vayu-Air

Fire-Agni

Jal-Water

Earth-Prithvi

Interestingly these 5 elements have got an interesting relationship to five senses. Find out more about the elements The Jai Jais way

Sheshnag the Five Headed Snake

Sheshnag the Five Headed Snake

Did you know that Lord Vishnu had a five headed snake? Snakes are considered holy by Hindus. They are worshipped during festivals like Nag Panchami and worshipped via the Snake-goddess Manasa. Sheshnag is the ‘Nagaraja’ or the King of the snakes and also took part in the story of creation with Lord Vishnu. In the Puranas Sheshnag is believed to hold all the planets of the Universe on his vast hoods. A devotee of Lord Vishnu, he constantly sings the glories of his Lord from all his mouths. Find out more about this mystical serpent. The Jai Jais way.
Symbolism of the Lotus Flower and A Story of Creation

Symbolism of the Lotus Flower and A Story of Creation

The symbolic Lotus flower, in shades of white, pink and purple.  An aquatic plant, beauty growing from the depth of muddy waters.  An iconic symbol in Hinduism, used as the throne of many deities. Definitely one of my favourite flowers, there is something so majestic about the beauty and symbolism of the lotus.

The lotus also has an exciting part to play in the story of creation.